Representative of Overseas Business

The UK is an excellent destination for businesses. If you also wish to set up a branch or register your business in the UK, you can do so. If you are a senior team member of a non-UK company or a sole representative of a non-UK company, you can apply for a Sole Representative visa to come to the UK to set up a UK branch or wholly-owned subsidiary.
You can also apply for a Sole Representative visa if you are an employee of an overseas newspaper, news agency, or broadcasting organization and you are being posted to the UK on a long-term assignment.

Eligibility

To be eligible to apply for a Sole Representative visa of overseas business to the UK, you need to meet the following conditions:

1. You must be able to support yourself financially without seeking public
funds;
2. You must meet the English language requirement. You may have to prove
your knowledge of the English language by either passing an approved
English language test or having an academic qualification taught in
English language is equivalent to a UK bachelor’s degree, master degree or PhD;
3. You must be recruited and work outside the UK. The active and trading
a business that employs you must have its headquarter and principal place
of business outside the UK, and it will remain outside the UK in the future as
well.
4. You must have the necessary skills, experience, and knowledge to perform
the role assigned to you.
5. Your position in the business must be of a senior rank with full authority to make decisions on its behalf. However, you should not own or control the
majority of the company.
6. Your intention must be to set up the first commercial presence in the UK of the overseas business by setting up a branch or a wholly-owned
subsidiary.

Documents to be submitted

When you apply for a UK Sole representative visa, you need to submit the following documents:

  • Your current passport or a valid travel ID.
  • Proof such as a bank statement or salary slip for the last six months to establish that you can support yourself financially.
  • Proof of knowledge of the English language.
  • If you apply from outside the UK, you need to submit your accommodation details during your stay in the UK. Also, if you come from a country where taking a Tuberculosis test is mandatory, you need to submit your TB test’s result.

If any of your documents are not in English or Wales, you need to submit a certified translation copy.

You also need to submit other documents that define your role, position etc. You need to submit the following:

  • A complete description of the business tells the business’s activities, assets, and accounts.
  • A letter that confirms that the overseas business will set up a branch or wholly-owned subsidiary in the UK in the same business activity run overseas.
  • Your job description, job contract, and salary details.
  • Proof in the form of a letter confirming that you are familiar with the business and have operational decision-making powers.
    If you are representing a newspaper news agency or broadcasting organization, you need to submit evidence to confirm that you will be representing them in the UK on a long-term basis.

How long can you stay?

You can stay for an initial period of 3 years on a UK sole representative visa, after which you can apply for two-year extension.
If you are looking for representations you can get a free assessment from one of our lawyers at Visa and Migration Ltd. You can call 02034111261 or email info@visaandmigration.com

How to Establish Sole Responsibility for a child

If both parents of a child are already in the UK or relocating to the UK, they can bring their children to the UK. The immigration rules permit this, provided the child or children are below the age of 18 and can be adequately maintained and accommodated in the UK by their parents.
However, if only one parent of a child is in the UK or going to be in the UK while the other parent will remain abroad, such parents can bring their child or children to the UK by proving that they are solely responsible for their child. They need to pass the sole responsibility test or, in other words, establish sole responsibility for their children.
The immigration rule of the UK states – that parents cannot decide what is best for their children, but instead, the parent relocating to the UK must prove that there is a perfect reason for the child to be brought to the UK.
You can also join your child based on having sole responsibility in the UK who is a British citizen or has been settled in the UK for at least seven years.

Sole responsibility

As the term suggests, sole responsibility means only one parent (mother or father) is responsible for upbringing the child. If you are a parent of such a child, you need to prove that you have been solely responsible for the parental care of your child for a substantial period.
If your child was under the supervision of your relatives abroad, it is acceptable, but your child should not be under the care of relatives of the child’s other parent. Sole responsibility means that you have complete responsibility for your child’s major long-term decisions, such as his/her education, the faith he/she is raised in, etc., until your child is 18 years old.

How to establish sole responsibility

The test for establishing Sole responsibility is provided by the case of TD
(Paragraph 297(i)(e): “sole responsibility”) Yemen [2006] UKAIT 00049 –
The test is, not whether anyone else has day-to-day responsibility, but whether the parent has continuing control and direction of the child’s upbringing including making all the important decisions in the child’s life – if not, responsibility is shared and so not “sole”.
To bring your child to the UK based on your child’s sole responsibility, you need to establish or pass the sole responsibility test to the Home Office. To pass this test, you need to prove things like:

  • Legal responsibility – This means that if parents of a child have
    separated/divorced, the court has given the custody of their child to the parent living in the UK. However, legal custody is not the same as sole responsibility.
    So, in some cases, the Home Office may not accept your sole parental
    responsibility despite a court order of legal custody of the child in your favor.
  • Financial responsibility – You need to prove that you provide the entire or
    ‘majority’ of the financial support for your child’s upbringing.
  • Emotional responsibility – You need to prove here that you make the significant decisions about your child’s upbringing, such as which school your child attends, where he/she lives, his/her religious practices, etc.
  • Day to Day Responsibility – You need to prove that the day-to-day decisions in connection with the child’s life are taken by you or you instruct someone to take the decisions you have made.

Raising the evidence of this is generally where people face problems.
Also, you need to prove to the Home Office that you have had sole responsibility for your child for a substantial period, and you have day-to-day control of your child.
If you migrated to the UK and have been separated from the child, the Home Office will look for how long you have been separated from your child and what relationship you have with your child during this period. The child’s care in such a situation must be taken by your relatives and not by the relatives of the child’s other parent.

Serious and compelling reasons

It depends on case to case. If you can prove that there are severe and compelling reasons for the child to join you in the UK, such as emotional or physical factors relating to you or the other parent abroad is mentally or physically incapable of taking care of the child, the Home Office may allow your child to join you in the UK. But it is not necessary because the Home Office may still consider otherwise.

Human Rights

Part 8 of the Immigration Rules provides the right to family life. You can argue your application based on human rights. The Secretary of state has the right to interfere with family life for immigration control. However, the Home Office may remind you that family life can also be achieved elsewhere outside the UK.

If you are looking for representations on any of the above routes you can get a free assessment from one of our lawyers at Visa and Migration Ltd. You can call 02034111261 or email info@visaandmigration.com

You can also follow us on social media

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/visaandmigration/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/visamigrationuk

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/visa-and-migration-a4aa9910b

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel

British passport for children born outside the UK

Children born outside the UK can acquire British citizenship by descent depending upon when you were born and your parent’s status at the time of your birth, you can apply for a British passport.

British by descent

If your father or mother or both were born in the UK and one of them or both were British citizens, then you will be a British citizen regardless of where you were born. If you were born outside the UK, you are classified as British by descent, and this means you can automatically apply for your first British passport.
If you are a British citizen of descent, you cannot pass on British citizenship to your children. Your child needs to be registered with the British authorities first to apply for their British passport. However, you must be living in the UK for at least three years before the birth of your child, and during these three years, you must not be absent from the UK for more than 270 days. You are expected to register your child’s British nationality before their 1st birthday.

A child born outside the UK before 1 January 1983

If you were born before 1 January 1983 outside the UK and your father is British, you may automatically be a British citizen and thus apply for a British passport. At the time of your birth, your father must have been
a. A citizen of the UK and Colonies
b. Married to your mother
c. Able to pass on his citizenship to you.
If you were born before 1983 and at the time of your birth, your mother was a British citizen and not your father, and also your parents were not married, your birth needs to be registered with the British authorities before making a first-time passport application.

A child born outside the UK between 1983 and June 2006

Your birth needs to be registered your birth with British authorities before applying for a first-time British passport if your British father was not married to your mother when you were born. However, if your parents were married before or after you were born, in case your father was a British citizen, but your mother was not a British citizen, and they could pass on their citizenship to you, you would automatically become a British citizen
and thus apply for a British passport. Also, if your father or mother was a British citizen, there is no requirement to register your birth to apply for a British passport.

A child born outside the UK on or after 1 July 2006

A child born outside the UK on or after 1 July 2006 to a British born or naturalized father becomes British national automatically and thus does not require to be registered whether the applicant’s parents were married or not. Therefore, a child born after 1 July 2006 gets a British passport automatically in this situation.

If you are looking for professional advice to apply for a British passport you can contact us for a free assessment by calling 02034111261 or emailing:
info@visaandmigration.com.

Sponsor Licence – What you need to know

If you are a UK based company or an organisation and want non-UK employees in your organisation, you need a sponsor license.
You can employ most foreign workers through a sponsor license, including Skilled Visa Workers. From 1 January 2021, you need a sponsor licence to hire EU, EEA, and Swiss nationals who arrived in the UK after 31 December 2020.
The Home Office grants sponsor licenses to such organisations only, showing the roles they are recruiting for, workers they are looking to sponsor and meet the other requirements. Your HR system in the organisation must comply with sponsorship compliance duties.

Types of Sponsor license

There are mainly two types of sponsor licenses offered by the Home Office, and these two categories have their sub-categories.
Two kinds of sponsor licenses are
1. Worker sponsor license – This license enables organisations to recruit staff from outside the UK on a long term basis, and it has sub-categories that include
a. Skilled worker
b. Intracompany visas and
c. Minister of Religion
2. Temporary Worker Sponsor license – This license allows organisations to recruit overseas nationals temporarily. Under this category, there are the following types available:
a. Creative or Sporting worker
b. Charity worker
c. Religious Worker
d. Government Authorised Exchange Worker
e. International Agreement worker
f. Seasonal worker

Eligibility for a sponsor license

You need to fulfil the following conditions to be eligible to apply for a sponsor license:

1. Your organisation must have a UK presence.

2. Your organisation must be trading or operating lawfully in the UK.
3. You must have HR systems and procedures in place.
4. If it is required that your organisation be registered or inspected by a
statutory body to operate lawfully in the UK, you must be registered with
the appropriate body and submit evidence for this.
5. At least one team member or director settled in the UK must fill the critical personnel roles.
6. You must offer genuine employment at the NQF Level 3 or above.
7. You must pay the correct salary as specified by the Home Office. The
minimum wage you need to pay for the Skilled Worker Visa is at least
£25,600 gross per annum, and it may be more or less depending upon
the specific job and the specific migrant you have chosen for the role.
Health and Care Workers have to paid a salary in accordance with Table 3
of Appendix Skilled Occupations of the Immigration Rules.

Sponsor license duties

As an organisation, you need to comply with specific duties for sponsorship license to prevent illegal working. Home Office has prescribed the following responsibilities in its guidance:
1. Record keeping
2. Monitoring and reporting
3. Absence monitoring and
4. Notifying the Home Office when there are changes in circumstances.

If you are looking for advice and assistance in applying for a sponsor licence you can contact us for a free assessment with one of our lawyers at Visa and Migration Ltd. You can call 02034111261 or email info@visaandmigration.com

Why Visitor Visas are refused

When you intend to visit the UK for a short period (up to 6 months) for various purposes such as tourism, business, study, medical treatment etc., you can apply for a UK Visitor Visa. Before you apply for a UK Visitor Visa, you need to do the following:
1. Whatever you plan to do in the UK, you should check if it is allowed as a visitor;
2. You should check whether you meet the eligibility requirements or not; and
3. Check whether you need to apply for a visa or not.
If you need to apply for a UK Visitor Visa, you can apply online.

Reasons for Visitor Visa refusal

When you apply for a UK Visitor Visa, UKVI (UK Visas and Immigration) looks at whether you meet the eligibility and suitability conditions or not. The application will be assessed based on the information you have given in the online form, the supporting documents and/or during the visa interview.
If you fail to meet the eligibility and suitability conditions, your application for UK Visitor Visa will be usually refused. For example, if the activity you are planning to do in the UK is not permissible under this route or you have breached the UK immigration rules in the past, or your financials are unclear, your visa application will be refused.

Eligibility requirements

You must demonstrate that you are a genuine visitor and a real visitor satisfies the following to the UKVI.
a. You will stay for a short period of up to 6 months and intends to leave the UK at the end of the stay.
b. You will not visit the UK through successive or frequent visits or make the UK his primary home.
c. Your purpose of the visit is allowed through a Visitor visa.
d. You will be able to manage his finances independently without accessing public funds during his stay in the UK, including the cost of return or onward journey.

Suitability requirements

UKVI can refuse your application for lack of meeting suitability requirements. There are some mandatory grounds of refusal and some discretionary grounds assessed by UKVI for denying a UK Visitor Visa. For example, if you are currently the subject of a deportation order, it becomes a mandatory ground for UKVI to refuse your visa.
On the other hand, if UKVI believes that your exclusion from the UK is in the interest ofthe public good because of your conduct, character, or other reasons, it is undesirable to grant your visa application. This is a type of discretionary ground for the refusal of visas.

If you have been convicted of a criminal offence for which you have been sentenced to imprisonment of:
a. at least four years; or
b. Between 1 and 4 years, unless at least ten years have passed since the end of the sentence; or
c. Less than one year, unless at least five years have passed since the end of the sentence.

Other common reasons for refusal of UK Visitor Visa

  •  If you are found to have submitted false information in the past by way of
    representation or fraudulent documents or where you did not disclose material facts.
  • If you are found to have breached UK immigration law in the past. For example, you overstayed or breached a condition attached to your leave.
  • If you fail to submit required documents in support of your application, such as a valid travel document to prove your nationality and identity to the UKVI.
  • If you have failed to pay NHS charges of a total value of at least £500, or you
    have been unable to produce any litigation costs awarded to the Home Office.

If you are looking for professional assistance in applying for a UK Visitor visa, you can call our team of lawyers for a free assessment on 02034111261 or email us at info@visaandmigration.com

You can also follow us on social media

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/visaandmigration/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/visamigrationuk

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/visa-and-migration-a4aa9910b

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel

Partner and Spouse Visa Requirements

Partner or Spouse visa is a visa type under the UK Family Visa category. One can apply for a Spouse or Partner visa to join their partner in the UK.
Applicants must have a genuine relationship with their UK partners. To apply as a partner or spouse, you and your partner both need to be 18 or over.

Who can be your partner in the UK?

The first thing is that you can be a partner if you are a spouse, civil partner and fiance, proposed civil partner of a British citizen, or someone with settled status in the UK. Your partner must be one of the following:

  • A British citizen;
  • Settled in the UK. For example, they have indefinite leave to remain, settled
    status or proof of permanent residence;
  • In the UK, having a refugee status or humanitarian protection in the UK;
  • If they are from the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein, they must have a pre-settled status which means they must have started living in the UK before 1 January 2021; and
  • Having a Turkish Businessperson visa or Turkish Worker visa

Partner and Spouse visa requirements

To apply as a partner or spouse, you need to meet the following conditions:
1. You and your partner both must be aged 18 or over;
2. You are married to or in a civil partnership, unmarried partner, and or a fiancé;
3. Your relationship must be genuine and subsisting
4. You must intend to live together permanently in the UK
5. You and your partner must be able to show that you can be supported financially without seeking public funds. The minimum income per annum threshold is £18,600. If you have a child as a dependent, then the minimum
Please note – the income requirement per annum increases by £3,800 for first child and £2,400 extra for each additional child. These do not apply if the children are British.
You can rely on several different sources of income such as salary from
employment or income from self-employment or non-work income such as rents from the property, cash savings greater than £16,000, maternity pay, and pensions.
You will be exempt from meeting the financial requirement if your partner in the UK is a recipient of specified benefits or allowance.

6. If you or your partner was in any previous relationship, it must have broken down permanently.
7. There must be adequate accommodation for you and your partner to live in the UK.
8. You must meet the English language requirement.

If you are looking for representation of your application under this route you can call our team of lawyers at Visa and Migration Ltd on 02034111261 or email us at info@visaandmigration.com

You can also follow us on social media

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/visaandmigration/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/visamigrationuk

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/visa-and-migration-a4aa9910b

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel

How to present a UK Visitor Visa

The most common mistake people make when presenting their application for a UK visitor visa is that they never provide a clear picture of their finances. UK Visitor Visa is a short-term visa that allows you to come and stay in the UK for up to 6 months. You can visit the UK for various purposes such as holiday, meeting your family, study, medical treatment etc.
The requirements for all the visitor visas are provided under Appendix V of the Immigration Rules
The general eligibility requirements apply to all visitor visas.

How to apply for a visitor visa?

If you wish to apply for a UK visitor visa you should visit www.gov.uk and complete the relevant application online, submit the documents by uploading these to VFS or TLS centres, and finally attending the appointment for biometrics and submit the passport.

What to submit?

You need to understand that the visitor visa is a temporary visa and will be given for a 6 month length or the length you are applying, however, you should try and stick to the period you have stated on your application that you will be visiting for.
You should always show all your ties to your home country or the country you reside in, for example, your income, your assets including properties, valuation for the properties, your family ties, or any other long-term commitments you have to the country you are applying from. These prove that you will return to your home country or the country of your presence.

Documents Required

The documents depend on the applicants circumstances, however, there are only some mandatory evidence for example –

  •  Your passport with a validity of atleast 6 months;
  • Evidence of accommodation in the UK; and
  • Evidence of your finances – please make sure you are as transparent as
    possible with your bank statements.

If you are looking for professional assistance with your visitor visa application you can contact Visa and Migration Ltd for a free assessment of your circumstances by calling +44(0)2034111261 or email – info@visaandmigration.com

Domestic Violence ILR Requirements

If you are in the UK on a spouse visa, civil partnership visa or unmarried partner visa and you are a victim of domestic violence, you can apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain as a victim of domestic violence. You could use ILR to settle permanently in the UK as a victim of domestic violence only if your relationship with your partner broke down due to domestic violence.

What is domestic violence?

Any incident or pattern of incidents in which one is suffering controlling, coercive, threatening, degrading, and violent behaviour by a partner, including sexual violence, is considered domestic violence. Domestic violence can be but not limited to the following types:

  • Psychological
  • Physical violence
  • Emotional and mental abuse
  • Sexual violence
  • Financial
  • Coercive control
  • Online or digital abuse
  • Harassment and stalking

Both men and women can suffer domestic violence.

Requirements for ILR as a victim of domestic violence

It would help if you met the following conditions to be eligible for the destitute domestic violence concession is also known as DDV:
1. You must be a victim of domestic violence.
2. Your first grant of limited leave must have been as a spouse, civil partner or unmarried partner of a British citizen or a settled person in the UK under
Appendix FM of the Immigration Rules, this does not include your leave as a
fiancé or as a partner of a refugee granted leave under paragraph 352 A of
the immigration rules.
3. Your marriage, civil or unmarried partnership must have broken down
permanently because of domestic abuse.

To obtain ILR as a victim of domestic violence, you must:
  •  be in the UK;
  • have made a valid application;
  • meet the suitability requirements for ILR;
  • meet the eligibility requirements for ILR
Proving domestic abuse

There is no specific evidence or documents that must be produced to prove that your relationship broke down because of domestic violence. Each application is considered on an individual basis. However, your application for ILR based on domestic violence can be supported by the following documents – for example:

  • A criminal conviction against your partner for committing domestic violence against you and your children;
  • An arrest order;
  • A police caution or police report;
  • Medical report showing that your injuries were consistent with domestic violence;
  • Police attended a domestic violence incident at your home;
  • A non-molestation order or occupation order from the civil court;
  • Referral confirmed by any person who is a member of a Multi-agency risk
    assessment conference (MARAC);
  • Domestic Violence Protection order;
  • Letters from Domestic Violence charities;
  • Etcetera
Fee and waiver of fee

The fee for applying for ILR as a victim of domestic violence is not different from other ILR applications. The cost is £2,389. However, the payment will be waived if you can prove that:

  • You have neither adequate accommodation nor any means of having one; or
  • You are destitute; or
  • You have adequate accommodation, but you are unable to pay for other
    essential needs for living.

There may be a need to provide evidence of your income and expenses if requested by the Home Office.
If you are looking for representation of your application under this route you can call our team of lawyers at Visa and Migration Ltd on 02034111261 or email us on info@visaandmigration.com

You can also follow us on social media

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/visaandmigration/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/visamigrationuk

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/visa-and-migration-a4aa9910b

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel

UK Spouse Visa Requirements

British citizens or those settled in the UK (Holding ILR or settled or pre-settled status under Appendix EU or Holding a Status under ECAA) can bring their non-British partners to the UK. UK Spouse Visa falls under the UK Family visa category. UK Spouse visa is required to enter the UK and live with your partner. Those who receive a spouse visa initially get it for 33 months from outside the UK or 30 months inside the UK. You can also apply to extend your visa after the initial grant.

Spouse visa requirements:

It would be best if you met the following conditions to be able to receive spouse visa approval:

1. Relationship requirements

The first requirement is that you and your partner must be aged 18 or above. You can be married, fiance or in a civil partnership, proposed civil partner or unmarried partners with a British citizen or one who is settled in the UK. You must have physically met your partner at least once before or during your marriage.
You must prove that your relationship is genuine and subsisting. You must intend to live together as well. Depending upon your relationship with your partner, you also need to confirm the following:
a. Your marriage or civil partnership is valid.
b. You are engaged and seeking to enter the UK so that you can marry your fiance within six months of entry in the UK.
c. If you apply as an unmarried partner, you need to prove that you have lived together for at least two years before applying.
d. Any previous relationship of both the applicant and UK partner have ended permanently.

2. Financial requirement

You and your partner must prove that you have a minimum annual income of £18,600. But if you have dependent children, you need to show an additional income of £3,800 per year for the first child and £2,400 for each additional child. If you depend upon cash savings to meet the financial requirement, you must demonstrate at least £62,500.
Suppose your UK partner is a recipient of a permitted benefit such as Disability Living Allowance, Severe Disablement Allowance, Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit, Attendance Allowance, Personal Independence Payment etc. in the UK. In that case, you are exempt from meeting the minimum income threshold, however, you need to
meet the maintenance and accommodation requirements.

3. Accommodation requirement

You need to furnish proof of adequate accommodation in the UK. This means you or your UK partner needs to own or occupy the accommodation. You can have a rented property, temporary accommodation, a mortgaged or owned property. The minimum requirement of accommodation is one bedroom and If you have a child, you must have an additional bedroom for each of your children dependent on their age and sex. You need to prove that you intend to live together in the same accommodation after completing UK immigration.

4. English language requirement

You need to meet the English language requirement. One way of doing this is by scoring at the level A1 or higher on the CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference for language) scale or A 2 for the extension. If not, you can also meet the English language requirement by submitting proof of your graduation or obtaining a degree from an English language University.
If you come from one of the following countries you don’t need to prove your English language ability.

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • The Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • USA

If you are looking for apply for a spouse visa you can get a free assessment of your circumstances by contacting Visa and Migration Ltd on 02034111261

You can also follow us on social media

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/visaandmigration/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/visamigrationuk

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/visa-and-migration-a4aa9910b

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel

Spouse Visa Refused

Visa refusal is not a good thing. However, this is a reality. A UK spouse visa is for those who wish to join their partner who is either a British citizen or settled in the UK (Holding ILR or settled or pre-settled status under Appendix EU or holding a status under ECAA).
So, one should avoid making mistakes that could result in visa refusal. You should be aware of the reasons that could result in spouse visa refusal. Here are some:

The main reasons for spouse visa refusal.

1. Your relationship is not genuine.
2. Immigration officers fail to believe that your marriage is genuine or subsisting.
3. You and your partner fail to meet the financial requirement, i.e. annual income of £18,600 or savings of £62,500 has not met.
4. You have submitted the wrong documentation, or you have not submitted all the required documents.
5. You have not filled the forms correctly.
6. You fail to meet adequate accommodation and maintenance requirements.
7. You fail to meet the English language requirement.

These are some of the main reasons which can potentially cause your spouse visa refusal.

What to do if your spouse visa has been refused?

It would be best if you tried to avoid reasons in the first place so that your spouse visa has not been refused. But once your visa has been denied, you also need to know what is the remedy to this.

UK Spouse visa Appeal

You can appeal against a spouse visa refusal at the First-Tier Tribunal based on HR claims. Human rights are the only ground for spouse visa refusal. The rights under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights stated the right to respect private families.
It says,

“Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home, and his correspondence. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is following the law and is necessary for a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety, or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or the protection of the rights and freedoms of others”

You can appeal in 28 days if you are given the right to appeal from outside the UK or 14 days from inside the UK.

How to make an appeal?

You can appeal online or by post. However, online appeals are quicker than appeals by post.

New Application

In some cases it may be best to lodge a new application as this is quicker and the issue of refusal can be resolved by simply submitting the evidence required.
If you are looking for professional advice and representation on your application, you can contact Visa and Migration Ltd on 02034111261

You can also follow us on social media

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/visaandmigration/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/visamigrationuk

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/visa-and-migration-a4aa9910b

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel